Pride and Engagement in Rehabilitation Excellence

“A nurse that earns and maintains the CRRN credential shows their organization, colleagues, and patients they take pride in their career and value personal achievement,” explains Roselle Anderson, RN, CRRN and Clinical Nurse Manager for 2 West at the MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital.

April 4, 2014

Teamwork helps to achieve CRRN

“A nurse that earns and maintains the CRRN credential shows their organization, colleagues, and patients they take pride in their career and value personal achievement,” explains Roselle Anderson, RN, CRRN and Clinical Nurse Manager for 2 West at the MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital.

The Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse, informally known as the CRRN, is the credential administered and directed by the Rehabilitation Nurse Certification Board (RNCB). Admissions Manager, Leena Oommen, RN, CRRN, says “the CRRN title not only instills confidence in a nurse but it also helps prepare nurses to take better care of patients with rehabilitation needs.” Oommen says that in the Admissions service area at MedStar NRH, “we have hired brilliant new graduate nurses who have no nursing experience. We introduced them to rehabilitation and after two years of teaching and learning about rehabilitation we encouraged them to sit for the CRRN.”

In December 2013 seven of MedStar NRH’s nurse liaisons attempted the exam and successfully passed. “It has been a very rewarding experience not only for the newly certified CRRNs but for our service area as a whole,” says Oommen.

“A CRRN certification validates a rehab nurse’s expertise to his/her colleagues, supervisors and clients alike,” says Admissions Manager Ramon B. Amon, RNC, CRRN. Amon says that the certification adds to his confidence and competence in his work. “Having been a liaison nurse for many years, and now as a manager, I can say with certainty that referral sources look up to me for advice and direction when assessing patients largely because of my CRRN certification and because of my experience in the field,” he says.

Senior Liaison Nurse Evaluator, Faith Saporsantos, MSN, RN, CRRN agrees, stating, “certification has provided me a sense of personal and professional accomplishment. It represents specialized knowledge and expertise. Becoming a CRRN validates nursing experience and enhances professional credibility within the rehabilitation setting. I have made an investment in myself that can offer professional rewards and lead to opening new doors for the future.”

And those incentives for the professional nurse to obtain their CRRN include:

  • Personal Accomplishment
  • Professional Achievement
  • Career Advancement, Recognition and Credibility
  • Enhanced Work Environment

Admissions nurse and recently certified CRRN, Tami Lyn Forth, RN, added her insights by saying, “to the public and to individual nurses, certification usually means expert, high-quality, competent nursing care. Since the liaison nurse evaluator does not perform direct care, I believe the certification signifies that we have a much more comprehensive understanding of the level of care and needs of the patient and caregivers.”